Most of the information you'll find calls this superb market town 'Garze', but most of the locals call it 'Ganzi'. No matter what you call it, though, it would be hard to imagine a more beautiful place to relax for a few days on a tour of Kham. Like most of the ethnically-Tibetan towns here on the Plateau, the ratio of police to residents here seems to be about 1:1, but practically what that usually means is big groups of 20-something cops standing around chatting with each other, driving around going GRNK! GRNK! at traffic with their sirens, or occasionally just napping in lawn chairs on the street. Johannesburg this is not.

Regardless, the real attraction here comes in two forms. First, the looming, sharp, snowcapped mountains of the Gongga Shan range rising in a high grey-white wall to the south of the town, as pretty as anything you've ever seen. And second, the enormous Khampa Tibetan community resident here, including hundreds of monks from the monastery in the old quarter up the hill, populating the streets, shopping for sneakers or mobile phones, or just hanging out in restaurants drinking tea. Like pretty much everywhere I've gone in Tibet, the welcome is noticeably friendlier than you get in many of the culturally Han parts of China --  the number of 'Tashi Deles' you'll get just walking down the street typically numbers in the dozens. Beyond that, there are good supermarkets, restaurants, street food and -- thank god -- real beer, a welcome respite from the watered-down 2.5% stuff sold everywhere else. 

Set in the high Tibetan grasslands, Ganzi is exceptional. Visit and you'll probably end up staying longer than intended.