Viewing entries tagged
adventure

'Osh and the Edge' Kyrgyzstan Feature PUBLISHED on Bikepacking.com

'Osh and the Edge' Kyrgyzstan Feature PUBLISHED on Bikepacking.com

Bikepacking.com has run a feature of mine, titled ‘Osh and the Edge’ on the attempt to pioneer a bikepacking route over the Alai Mountains in southern Kyrgyzstan. Covering the topics of adventure and adventure-travel writing, it’s a look at the sometimes beautiful and sometimes stupid and dangerous ways in which we’re driven to find our limits.

Give ‘Osh and the Edge’ a read here if you’re curious!

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Published: 'A Walk on the Wild Side' (Adventure Travel Magazine)

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Published: 'A Walk on the Wild Side' (Adventure Travel Magazine)

Adventure Travel has just run my piece on the rugged Vicentina and Alentejo coast of southwestern Portugal. Take a look at the piece and original photography from the walk below.

"This is Europe’s Empty Quarter – the southwestern-most corner of the continent, containing nearly a third of Portugal’s landmass but less than a tenth of its population. In the celebrated tourist city of Lagos, down on the south coast, I’d be bumping up against bar touts advertising cheap drinks and live DJ sets. Here, there’s nothing, no one – nothing but the extreme, wild, shattered edge of Europe itself, towering cliffs broken and folded like mementos of catastrophe on an unimaginable scale, swallowed and emerging, again and again, into and from the relentless sea. The wind is a presence in the night all around me like a thing enraged. I really need to get under shelter..."

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PUBLISHED on Bikepacking.com - "The Bartang Valley, Tajikistan"

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"The most adventurous way across the Pamirs, the Bartang Valley offers the best of Central Asia – sublime remoteness, high mountains and wild desert moonscapes, legendary hospitality, physical difficulty, and more than a little bit of danger."

The *true* bikepacking alternative to both the Pamir Highway and the Wakhan Valley, this route through Tajikistan's remote Bartang Valley should be considered a must-do for adventurous bikepackers and well-equipped cycle tourists in Central Asia. Want to do it yourself? Get all the info you need, including GPX files and maps, here on bikepacking.com.

PUBLISHED in Cycle Magazine: "Rocks, Crocs and Waterfalls" (Bikepacking Australia's Top End)

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PUBLISHED in Cycle Magazine: "Rocks, Crocs and Waterfalls" (Bikepacking Australia's Top End)

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Interested in cycling Australia but looking for something more adventurous than simply plowing across the Nullarbor? Check out my feature in Cycle Magazine about bikepacking Australia's fantastic Top End (in the wild Northern Territory). The route includes Litchfield and Kakadu national parks, as well as the superb (and croc-intensive!) Reynolds River Track. Take a look here!

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The Secret Road: Zhongdian to Yading

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The Secret Road: Zhongdian to Yading

On the highway forty kilometres north of Zhongdian there's an unassuming turnoff to a rough dirt road thru the high mountains. I'd been told about this 'secret road' by a cyclist named Matthew Harris back in Sydney. He said the road was truly very bad, but also very beautiful. That sounded perfect to me.

It was a long steep hellish climb along the road past a large-scale earthworks project, complete with dynamite blasting and a cracking altitude headache. Waking the next morning and continuing on into the high mountains, though, the views felt well earned. The mountains were wild and snowcapped and sharp and I drank snowmelt straight as it poured into freezing streams off the huge snowfields there. Past the flapping prayer flags at 4600m, the road wound down in rough, rocky, muddy tracks crossed by torrents of meltwater, an hour of white-knuckled ripping downslope that's as fun as any riding I've done. 

It ended, like so much here, in a raw gouge in the earth snaking ambiguously downward, which presented a navigational problem. A paved road? Well, that naturally leads somewhere. A battlefield-like maze of Chinese construction tracks coming off a mountain at 3800m, pocked and rutted and covered in moon dust two inches thick? Well, let's just say that just because you have a GPS doesn't mean you aren't lost. The roads you're on don't technically exist yet, and they're all the more treacherous for it. My brake rotors were too hot to touch, and bouncing from one gigantic, dust-covered pothole to another, I found myself pitched off the bike and lightly bleeding. Nonetheless, this was the precisely the route I'd chosen my equipment for. The 29+ platform, even fully loaded, made the secret road not just possible, but fun.

And when I finally reached the tarmac again near the hamlet of Geka, filthy and aching, I bivvied by the river, washing the dirt off my body by moonlight beneath the high steep walls. In the morning, a gorgeous 2000m climb on landslide canyon roads to a freezing pass in the spooky twilight, then descending screaming-fast to the village of Echu, where I found no lodging but instead a group of ambiguously friendly strangers who bundled me into a van to a Super 8 Motel in city I had no idea even existed, just in time for me to become violently ill.

That secret road thru the mountains, though, was indeed the real deal.

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